Tag Archives: entrepreneurship
Aside 4 May

Very few investors tell you “no”. Overwhelmingly, they just never email you back, even after they were the ones initiating the conversation. If they do tell you no, their reasons are often weird or cryptic.

Source: Priceonomics Raises $1.5 MM, Users Unfazed

Advertisements
Aside

‘Emotional attachment to a vision shouldn’t override the messages the market is sending you.’

13 Mar

‘It turns out that “never give up” is a dangerous lesson to take to heart with start-up companies. Emotional attachment to a vision shouldn’t override the messages the market is sending you. When the feedback from the market is not positive, when customers are not buying, when you have tried to pivot several times and you still haven’t gotten a foothold, it is wise to make a real and carefully considered evaluation and decide if your vision truly makes sense.’

Face It: You’re Clinging On to a Zombie Start-Up | WSJ

Aside

“What happens when we turn to very young and inexperienced entrepeneurs and hand them a wad of cash…”

15 Feb

“What happens when we turn to very young and inexperienced entrepeneurs and hand them a wad of cash and demand that they lead the way forward for the rest of us?”

Airy Labs and Ed-Tech Startup Failures

Aside

“…startup failure happens all the time. Startups burst onto the scene (and particularly now, in…”

15 Feb

“…startup failure happens all the time. Startups burst onto the scene (and particularly now, in such “frothy” times, they burst onto the scene with substantial investor backing). They stumble. They pivot. They adapt. And often they fail and sometimes they die. They die silently with a few founders saying “well shit, that didn’t really work out. Lessons learned. Let’s move on.” Or they die with a “hey, let’s make things right. Let’s pay back our investors and then get jobs or something.” Or, sometimes I guess, they die spectacularly and publicly, with stories in Techcrunch and a litany of nasty posts left on various forums around the Web. It happens. It happens now, and it’s happened in the past. The fact that we don’t actually know much about our history — as entrepreneurs or as educators — is part of the very unfortunate (ed-)tech amnesia we all suffer from. Perhaps that’s a big lesson to be drawn here.”

Airy Labs and Ed-Tech Startup Failures

Aside

“The truth is that startups are always in a hurry and always make mistakes. A good CEO knows that she…”

14 Feb

“The truth is that startups are always in a hurry and always make mistakes. A good CEO knows that she must remain nimble and prepared to deal with the fallout of those rushed decisions. And the mob has taught those nimble CEOs that a nuanced discussion is not what the mob wants to hear. They want to see that belly.”

I’m So, So Sorry. Here’s My Belly. Now Please Move On. « Uncrunched