Tag Archives: audience
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“in-home research visits are key to Facebook’s continued success. “A company can be very strong…”

12 Mar

“in-home research visits are key to Facebook’s continued success. “A company can be very strong technically,” she explains, “but without that connection to what people want, it’s difficult to build loyalty. In the end, it’s all about people. We don’t want to think about users. We want to think about people.””

Inside the Facebook Research Team’s In-Home Visits | Facebook

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“the single most important thing product owners can do to add value to their team, their product and…”

12 Mar

“the single most important thing product owners can do to add value to their team, their product and their company is a user test”

The Most Important Thing

Elsewhere on Ent!
Takeaways: Jason Schwartz’s ‘How Product is Built’ class at GA

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“Brands and their marketers suffer from what I refer to as medium’alism, a condition where inordinate…”

16 Feb

“Brands and their marketers suffer from what I refer to as medium’alism, a condition where inordinate value and weight is placed on the technology of any medium rather than amplifying platform strengths and ideas to deliver desired and beneficial experiences and outcomes. Said another way, businesses are developing for the sake of development and establishing supporting presences without regard for how someone feels, thinks, or acts as a result. In doing so, “engagement” programs are calculated, brought to life in the form of an editorial calendar that, by its very nature, isn’t not designed to really engage people at all.”

Engagement Ain’t Nothing But A Number | PandoDaily

See also: “if you build it, they will come”.

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“good designers don’t tend to think about consumers; they think about people and what they want…”

15 Feb

“good designers don’t tend to think about consumers; they think about people and what they want and need. It’s a subtle point, but thinking about people as consumers immediately dehumanizes them and makes it harder to empathize…good designers are good at iterative prototyping, refining the concept through repeated cycles and getting feedback from the right people as they go. James Dyson famously made two thousand prototypes of his bagless vacuum cleaner before he got it right. The rest, as they say, is history.”

How Good Designers Think – Simon Rucker – Harvard Business Review

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“Much of the debate over old media and new, Hollywood vs Silicon Valley, can be distilled down to who…”

13 Feb

“Much of the debate over old media and new, Hollywood vs Silicon Valley, can be distilled down to who ultimately calls the shots: the producer or the audience. To paraphrase Paul Weller: In a technology company, the public gets what the public wants. In a media company, the public wants what the public gets.”

A Real Media Company Doesn’t Care That You’re Mad At It | PandoDaily

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Facebook users: lonely

13 Feb

“People who used Facebook largely to socialize tended to be younger, more social and more neurotic—suggesting that Facebook habitués use the site partly as a tool to alleviate loneliness, the researchers said. People who used Twitter to socialize scored high on openness and sociability but low on conscientiousness.

Participants who used Twitter to seek or spread information, as opposed to socializing, were high on measures of conscientiousness and intellectual appetite and low on neuroticism; Facebook information-gatherers were less curious.”

All about audience targeting…

Facebook and Twitter Users’ Personalities, Robot Heater | Week in Ideas – WSJ.com

Link

How to Master the Design of Compelling Calls-to-Action

13 Feb

How to Master the Design of Compelling Calls-to-Action:

Some good tips here – and CTAs are often taken for granted.

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“What I do find to be a wonderful development is the way in which social discovery engines like…”

13 Feb

“What I do find to be a wonderful development is the way in which social discovery engines like Summify and Percolate surface much more relevant and much higher-quality content than search ever did. (Although I do worry, a lot, about the way in which Twitter seems to have bought Summify just to shut it down.) The more that we share stories and use such tools, the better the chance that great content will get an audience commensurate with its quality — even if it doesn’t have a web-friendly headlines like “How Your Cat Is Making You Crazy”.”

Quality vs quantity online | Felix Salmon

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Pissed off users = progress

11 Feb

“If you create a platform on the internet, if your users start screaming in rage on Twitter or in their blogs about something you’ve done, rejoice. You matter. You are successful vs. your 50 potential competitors who no one cares about enough to complain. Now, listen. Respond. Fix it.”

Just because you can make money from something doesn’t mean you should, and other rules of the web | Rex Hammock’s RexBlog.com

“I have never seen a successful business model built on the verb ‘should'”

9 Feb

I’m a compulsive underliner. I tend to prefer physical books over their electronic counterparts because “pen based annotation” is still largely superior to fiddling around with the Kindle’s highlight feature.

These were the first sentences I underlined in Mark Briggs’ “Entrepreneurial Journalism: How to build what’s next for news“. They’re from the book’s foreword, written by Jeff Jarvis. You may have heard of him.

Too often, I hear newspaper folk lament that people “should” pay for their news. I have never seen a successful business model built on the verb ‘should’, nor on tradition, virtue or what a journalist most wants to do. Successful, sustainable businesses are built on the public’s, and our success will be measured by how well we satisfy those needs in a competitive marketplace.

It’s important not to think of “pay” solely in monetary terms. Every startup, every business, every brand, every publisher is competiting not just for the public’s money; we are also competing for the (continued) attention of the people formerly known as the audience.

Which may be harder to capture than their wallets.